Category: Writing

Homeless child

Storytelling lifeline for a homeless boy

  “Sol’s” story is true, though I’ve changed his name out of deference for the young hero. I met him while working as Storytelling Director for Stagebridge, the US’s oldest senior theatre company. This story first appeared on January 26, 2011, on StoryRoute. Missing a chance to shine Marijo Joseph, a talented performer who often worked with Stagebridge, was teaching Sol… Read more →

Can a photo be sacred?

“Take a photo of us,” said Jem. She was sitting beside Henry (not their real names). Jem was his new friend, hoping to pick up some extra cash by throwing in with an experienced panhandler. As usual, I was walking with a camera slung around my neck. I always give Henry some change so stopped to chat. Photos as intrusion… Read more →

Book Giveaway: Remembrance of Things Present – Making Peace with Dementia

  This guest post by Peter Maeck will give you a taste of his wonderful book. He explores his father’s dementia through poetry, prose and photography. Dementia is achingly common. We need writers and artists like Peter Maeck to help us navigate the rough water. Below the post you will find an opportunity to win a copy of his moving… Read more →

Robin Morgan standing at lectern

Distilled by Parkinson’s

In May 2015, poet Robin Morgan gave a TED talk that woke me up. She had been diagnosed with Parkinson’s and wrote poems full of life and humor and insight. Who but a poet would say of a disease like that, “I do not feel diminished by Parkinson’s; I feel distilled by it, and I actually like very much the… Read more →

Farewell to an extraordinary muse

Ojibway writer Richard Wagamese is gone. He has left on the journey whose destination is mysterious to those of us still plodding along in our earthly lives. When I heard the news on CBC this morning, I was devastated. He had fallen silent on Facebook. His last entry was November 26, 2016, when he wrote: Two men saw a pile… Read more →

Millie’s Farm Family: teacher’s guide for the series

Millie’s going to school. The first three picture books about Millie and Turkey Baby and their farm pals now have their own teacher’s guide, for students from Kindergarten through Grade 3. Packed with background, vocabulary, questions, ideas and activities, the guide will enhance students’ experience of the books. Each book – Millie’s Feathered Foster Family, Turkey Baby and the Hungry… Read more →

Be a fierce Millie: safeguarding children who are victims of hate

As Canadians reel with horror from the news of gunmen shooting worshippers at a Quebec City mosque, my thoughts turn to a Mille Fleur hen and the turkey chick she mothered. It may seem an odd juxtaposition, but the rise in senseless attacks on The Other brings home the lessons her life exemplified. Attacking The Other The scene still makes… Read more →

Child with a lantern ventures into the night

Hope in uncertain times

    Years ago I was mesmerized by Laurens van der Post’s book, The Heart of the Hunter. His writing sank its hooks into my story-loving soul. Today I came across a conversation he had with another of my favorite storytellers, P.L. Travers. In it he tells part of a story I still remember from The Heart of the Hunter.… Read more →

Endless travel, without luggage or passport

If you were a kid who read by flashlight, covered in blankets you hoped would hide the light, this one’s for you. You danced with the Wild Things when your mother scolded you. You cheered when the spider, Charlotte, spun messages that saved her pal, Wilbur the pig. You ached for days when Travis had to shoot his beloved Old… Read more →

Millie’s about to get company

I’ll never forget the day we put a small, injured turkey chick into a cage with a broody Millefleur hen and held our breaths. Millie was the perfect foster mother for every stray chick. She had refused only one, a duckling. (Don’t tell my young Millie fans, but she pecked him, hard, on the head and pulled her foster chicks… Read more →

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